Lotus Flower

frequently asked questions

About retreats

What is retreat life like?

At Nibbāna Forest Refuge, most retreats follow a typical daily schedule that starts at 5:00 am and ends at 8:30 pm. The day is spent in silent practice with alternate periods of sitting and walking meditation. Two meals are served – breakfast, lunch and afternoon tea.  Please advise if you have a medical condition that prevents you from fasting and following the precept of not taking solid meals after noon. Comprehensive meditation instruction and talks about the Buddha’s teachings are offered daily.  In addition, group or individual meetings with the teachers about meditation practice take place at regular intervals.

A daily service period of work meditation is set aside each day. This gives retreatants an opportunity to practice mindfulness during everyday activities, from chopping vegetables or washing dishes to vacuuming or cleaning bathrooms. This voluntary service period is also essential to the smooth operation of Nibbāna Forest Refuge and allows us to provide a safe, healthy, and comfortable setting and environment.

Our retreat environment, with its simple yet nourishing lifestyle is designed to support and enhance your meditation practice.

What is a typical daily schedule like?

Here is a typical daily retreat schedule. Please note that it is only tentative – a more precise schedule will be available on your arrival.

DAYLONG RETREAT:

8:30 am – Registration

9:00 am – Welcome
9:30 am – Sitting meditation with instructions

10:15 am – Work-as-practice meditation

11:15 am – Sitting meditation with instructions
12:00 noon – Lunch

1:00 pm – Walking meditation

1:45 pm – Sitting meditation

2:30 pm – Dhamma Talk

3:30 pm – Q & A

4:00 pm – Closing

RESIDENTIAL RETREAT:

first day - opening

3:00 pm – Arrival & Registration
3:45 pm – Welcome & Orientation
4:30 pm – Settle In

5:00 pm – Light Dinner

6:15 pm – Sitting meditation
7:00 pm – Walking meditation
7:30 pm – Dharma talk
8:30 pm – Walking meditation

day 2-9

5:00 am – Wake up
5:30 am – Movement

6:30 am – Chanting, Sitting meditation

7:30 am – Work-as-practice meditation
8:30 am – Breakfast
9:00 am – Work-as-practice meditation
10:00 am – Sitting meditation
11:00 am – Dhamma Talk
12:00 noon – Lunch

1:30 pm – Q&A
2:00 pm – Sitting meditation or meetings with teachers
3:00 pm – Walking meditation or meetings with teachers
4:00 pm – Sitting meditation
5:00 pm – Tea time

6:00 pm – Chanting, Sitting meditation
7:30 pm – Dhamma talk
8:30 pm – Rest or continue meditation in room

last day - closing

5:00 am – Wake up
5:30 am – Movement

6:30 am – Chanting, Sitting meditation

7:30 am – Work-as-practice meditation
8:30 am – Breakfast
9:00 am – Closing
10:00 am – Departure

Why are retreats in silence?

Once your course begins, you will be asked to honor what is known as “noble silence” – a quieting of the body and voice that helps cultivate a calm and peaceful retreat environment. This powerful tool greatly enhances the deepening of concentration and awareness. Noble silence also fosters a sense of safety and spiritual refuge, even in a course filled with up to 100 participants.

Since walls are thin at Nibbāna Forest Refuge and everyone lives together in close community, your willingness to embrace the silence and simplicity helps everyone – it not only acts as a support for your own practice but is also a direct way of supporting your fellow retreatants.

Our teachers request that you not engage in other forms of communication while on retreat. Please turn off your cell phones for the duration of your stay and leave behind your laptops, iPods, iPads and other communication devices so that you can commit to your retreat wholeheartedly and reap the benefits of that commitment. Noble silence includes not reading, writing, keeping a journal, receiving mail, or otherwise keeping busy and distracted. By leaving at home the many activities and communications that worldly life entails, you offer yourself the gift of stillness.

Please give our office number to a family member or close friend to use in case of emergency so you do not have to check your cell phone. If you have fragile or dependent family members that you need to stay in contact with, please notify our office so arrangements can be made.

Silence is broken at the end of the retreat, in time to allow you to talk and share your experience with other participants.

Can I speak with a teacher while on retreat?

Although retreats are conducted in silence, there are scheduled times for retreatants to speak with teachers and ask questions about meditation practice.  Retreat managers are also available to answer questions in the during regular hours posted at the bulletin/announcement board.

Is a retreat appropriate for me at this time?

An intensive silent retreat can be a positive and life transforming experience. At the same time, meditation practice can be strenuous and requires some stability of physical and psychological health.

 

If you have recently experienced considerable trauma, significant depression or anxiety, or are currently experiencing strong PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder), a silent retreat may not be appropriate for you at this time in your life. A therapist can help you assess the wisest course duration for you, or if it’s best to wait a while before signing up. Daily life practice may be more beneficial meanwhile.

What if I have a disability or chronic health issue?

Nibbāna Forest Refuge welcomes all who are genuinely interested in meditation and who wish to participate in our programs. If you have a disability or chronic health issue, it is extremely important to let the us know as soon as you are considering registering or applying for a retreat, so that we can discuss how retreat life may impact you, and the level of support that we can realistically offer. 

For those with mobility issues, we will do our best to provide direct and easy access to our meditation and dining halls, as well as to most of our dormitory accommodations and bathrooms.

What if I have a disability or chronic health issue?

Nibbāna Forest Refuge welcomes all who are genuinely interested in meditation and who wish to participate in our programs. If you have a disability or chronic health issue, it is extremely important to let the us know as soon as you are considering registering or applying for a retreat, so that we can discuss how retreat life may impact you, and the level of support that we can realistically offer. 

For those with mobility issues, we will do our best to provide direct and easy access to our meditation and dining halls, as well as to most of our dormitory accommodations and bathrooms.

Why do you require a refundable registration deposit?

We ask for a Php.2,000 deposit to confirm your registration as assurance of your commitment.

 

The full deposit is refundable upon completion of the retreat and you will have the possibility to practice dana/generosity at the end of the retreat.

What if I cancel?

If you need to cancel your registration, please contact us as soon as possible.  Cancellation fees are Php. 1,000 if you cancel two weeks before a course begins; if you cancel less than two weeks before your retreat begins, your full deposit is forfeited.

Cancellation fees apply if you are confirmed into a course from the wait list and do not accept. So please notify us immediately if you decide you no longer wish to attend.

All cancellation fees support future retreats.

How do I know how much to donate?

You will have the possibility to practice dana/generosity at the end of the retreat.  A retreat typically costs the refuge Php. 700 per day per person. Your donation covers the overhead costs of running a retreat like food, staff salary, utilities, and supplies.  

 

These valuable teachings are priceless.  Nibbāna Forest Refuge and our teachers are continuing the ancient Buddhist tradition of freely offering the teachings. What this means is that the teachers receive no compensation for teaching at Nibbāna Forest Refuge and rely instead on the generosity of course participants for a sustainable income.

What clothing should I pack?

There are two mottos for clothing during your retreat – “Be prepared” and “Be comfortable.”

Weather in Sta. Maria, Laguna is extremely variable, and can change in an instant, so we recommend that you come well prepared, with clothing selected for comfort rather than style. Outdoor temperatures may be warm enough for short-sleeves and cold enough for light jackets, sometimes within the same day!

For those who are camping and those who like to walk outside, we suggest you bring a pair of rainboots or hiking shoes. 

As your meditation practice deepens, cool weather may affect you more than usual. Even for indoor wear, you may appreciate long sleeved shirts, a cap or scarf, warm sweaters or a shawl, and heavy socks. Summers can be hot, and modest lightweight clothing is the norm. Please keep your shoulders and knees covered at all times.  Do not bring clothing in noise-making, rustling fabrics such as nylon.

For your comfort in the dormitory accommodations, be sure to bring loose sweat suits, a bathrobe or other kinds of clothing that allow you to go with ease between your room and the bathroom facilities.  Please bring a sufficient supply of clothing to last the duration of your course. Our laundry facilities are available only for hand-washing of clothes.

What other essential items should I bring?

  • Indoor-only, soft-soled shoes or slippers. This helps contribute to the silence and overall cleanliness of our retreat environment.

  • Tent, flashlight

  • Insect repellant

  • Sleeping bag or sheets, pillow and pillowcase and towels. Linens and towels are not provided.

  • All necessary special foods and beverages.

  • Refillable drinking water bottle.

  • Plastic containers for special foods.

  • Medicines, vitamins, supplements, etc. If you have an existing medical condition, bring enough of all prescription medicines to last throughout the retreat.

  • Natural, biodegradable personal hygiene products. We ask that you anticipate your needs and bring unscented or lightly scented natural soap, shampoo and conditioner, body lotion, insect repellant and other hygiene products with you. (We stock a small selection of these items)

  • Please consider washing the items you bring with an unscented or lightly scented laundry detergent and softener before you come. Please do not wear any fragrance perfumes or chemical based products on the day of your arrival and throughout the retreat.  We highly encourage using natural, biodegradable products.

  • If you are acutely chemically sensitive, please let our office know.

  • If you have ever been to an emergency room because of a medical condition, bring your doctor’s telephone number in case the condition comes up while you’re on retreat.

What other optional items might I want with me?

  • Extra batteries.

  • Extra cash. If you are likely to need cash – for purchase of small hygiene or medical items – please bring it with you as Nibbāna Forest Refuge does not cash personal checks or process credit card transactions. We PayPal and bank to bank transfers to pay for registration deposit and donations.

  • You may want to bring a silent watch or alarm clock to keep track of time.

  • Insect repellent and/or head net. Bring insect repellent and a head net to protect yourself from especially-carnivorous, biting insects. Please remember, however, that strong-smelling repellent should not be worn in the meditation hall.

  • Your own meditation cushion or bench. Nibbāna Forest Refuge provides a basic zabuton (mat) and zafu (cushion) for you, in the meditation hall. Chairs are available for those who cannot sit on a cushion. Please bring any extra meditation props you may need, such as additional cushions, a meditation stool, a shawl or throw rug.

  • Yoga mat for self-led or teacher-led movement practice.

  • If you wish to practice in your room, native hut or tent, please bring your own meditation items for this.

  • Cloth napkins.

What should I know about cellphone use while I'm on retreat?

By refraining from using cellphones or other communication devices during your course, you contribute to creating a supportive environment of silence and simplicity for all retreatants. Retreat teachers will offer a time to turn in phones at the beginning of the course. This will allow you to reap the benefits of wholehearted participation in the retreat.  Please know that cell signal or mobile data are very intermittent at Nibbāna Forest Refuge.  We have no wifi.

If a member of your immediate family has a medical condition or other situation that requires you to be reachable around the clock, we will provide you with a phone number that your family can call in the event of an emergency that requires you to be notified immediately, day or night. 

What should I not bring or use while I'm on retreat?

Please don’t bring on retreat any scented hygiene or laundry products, since these can significantly affect fellow retreatants with chemical sensitivities. In addition, don’t pack candles, incense or ‘noisy’, rustling clothing.

Once your retreat starts, we ask that you refrain from using cell phones or other communication devices. And please make sure your watch doesn’t beep.

What if I get sick on retreat?

Important health care information

While our wish is to provide all who come on retreat at Nibbāna Forest Refuge with an environment most conducive to deepening meditation practice, there are practical limitations regarding the level of support we can reasonably offer. The following information outlines these limitations – please read this before your retreat begins.

In particular, we are unable and unqualified to provide medical and psychological care. For this reason, we request that – apart from unforeseen emergencies – you take care of your own health needs during your stay at Nibbāna Forest Refuge.

Participation in Nibbāna Forest Refuge programs is at the discretion of the teachers and Nibbāna Forest Refuge administration at all times. If, in the opinion of Nibbāna Forest Refuge, you are unable to continue to participate productively in your retreat, you may be asked to leave.

Mental health

If you are seeing a therapist and/or any other mental health professional, please inform them of your intention to participate in a silent retreat. If they have any concerns about your attendance, it is important to follow their recommendations.

 

Waiver of liability

On your arrival, you will be asked to sign a waiver of liability and to provide details regarding an emergency contact. Your cooperation with this is necessary in order for you to attend the retreat – you will not be allowed to participate unless we are given this information.

Nibbāna Forest Refuge will make every effort to communicate with your contact person in the event of an emergency. She/he should be someone who can either collect you from Nibbāna Forest Refuge or help to make transportation arrangements if you need to leave your retreat early.

NFR’s remote location

Our Forest Refuge facilities are located in a rural area that is approximately 1 hour away from the nearest hospital. (Paete General Hospital and Tanay General Hospital). A small pharmacy can be found in the nearby town of Sta. Maria, but there is no public transportation nor a taxi service in the area to take you there.

Because of the small size of our staff, we cannot, as a general rule, provide transportation for you into town. If certain circumstances do allow us to do this, there is a fee to help cover our expenses.

Prescription medications

If you are taking prescription medications for any reason, please ensure you bring enough supplies with you to continue treatment for the full duration of your retreat. Discontinuing taking your prescription medications during a retreat is grounds to be asked to leave Nibbāna Forest Refuge.

On your arrival, we will also ask for some details regarding your prescription medications. This is so that, in the event of an emergency, we can give the necessary information to Emergency Medical Services personnel. Otherwise, such details remain entirely confidential.

Checklist

Before arriving for your retreat, please make sure that you have the following in place:

  • The name and contact details of your emergency contact person.

  • Health insurance, or the ability to pay for expenses in the event of illness or a medical emergency. Any costs incurred for health services are your responsibility and not the responsibility of NFR.

  • Contact details for your physician, therapist and/or any other medical professionals whose treatment you are under.

  • An adequate supply of any prescription medications to cover the full duration of your retreat.

  • If you have any questions regarding the above, please contact us before you come.

What about COVID-19?

It’s important that everyone take some simple steps to minimize the transmission of infectious diseases. We ask your help with the following:

  • Please do not come to NFR if you are sick with flu symptoms – we will charge you our minimum cancellation fee only, and issue a refund for the balance. Call our office for more details.

  • If you start to experience flu-like symptoms while at NFR, please see our retreat manager or office staff immediately – they will assist with an appropriate course of action.

  • While at NFR, it is essential that all retreatants, staff and teachers wash their hands frequently and thoroughly, either with soap and water or using the hand sanitizer.

  • Cover any coughs and sneezes with a handkerchief or small towel.

NFR orientations, literature and signage will remind you of these practices once you are here.

Our current retreats are a rare opportunity to practice with seclusion and intimacy. We will  limit attendance, wear masks indoors, increase ventilation, practice social distancing, have daily temperature checks and self-scheduled practice periods.  We believe the site of Nibbāna Forest Refuge offers a responsible place for a small group retreat. There are private rooms, an enormous dining hall and also outdoor spaces set in a beautiful Sierra Madre forest.  Even with our precautions, any gathering will involve some degree of risk, so we leave it to your good judgement to determine if this opportunity is appropriate for you.

Please review the preventative measures and our new guidelines for reducing the spread of the coronavirus, and comments from students who attended our recent retreat in Georgia in September 2020.

Covid-19 and our Retreats at Nibbāna Forest Refuge

What if I have a medical emergency?

Urgent medical care

In the event of an urgent medical problem, we may be able to arrange for our staff to transport you to the Barre Clinic or to the emergency room of one of the nearby hospitals. In such circumstances, there is a fee to help cover our expenses.

If the medical problem requires continued professional care and you are unable to provide or arrange your own transportation for such care, it will be necessary to leave NFR, for your own safety.

What about sensitivity to fragrance and chemicals?

Because meditation retreat practice can lead to a heightened sense of awareness, some participants may develop a sensitivity to odors and perfumes, and some are allergic to many chemicals. Please do not bring or use perfumes or scented shampoos, ointments or lotions, or laundry products containing fragrance. We suggest that you bring unscented or natural products like essential oils with you, if possible. We stock a small selection of such items that can be purchased on arrival or during your retreat.

If you are acutely chemically sensitive, please let us know.

Why is simplicity supportive of meditation practice?

Nibbāna Forest Refuge co-founders, teachers and staff have given careful consideration to creating the conditions most conducive to deepening the qualities of tranquility, kindness and understanding. Silence and simplicity stand as two core pillars of our retreat culture and provide the framework for stepping back from the busyness and complexity of our lives and moving into a quieter way of being and living.

In this spirit, we request that you please:

  • Turn off your cell phones for the duration of your stay.

  • Leave behind your laptops, iPods, iPads and other communication devices.

  • Accept the simple accommodations and meals that are offered.

  • Keep your silence with friends and family members that are on retreat with you.

This allows you to commit to your retreat wholeheartedly and reap the benefits of that commitment. Since walls are thin at IMS and everyone lives together in close community, your willingness to embrace the silence and simplicity helps us all. It not only acts as a support for your own practice but is also a direct way of supporting your fellow retreatants.

Feel free to give our office number to a family member or close friend to use in case of emergency so that you do not have to check your cell phone. If you have fragile or dependent family members that you need to stay in contact with, please notify the NFR office so arrangements can be made.

Can I bring my service dog to Nibbāna Forest Refuge?

Trained service dogs in ADA-specified service are allowed. Please specify this on your registration or application form so we have maximum time to notify other retreatants, in case any have dog issues or allergies. Our office will also let you know our house rules regarding the care and exercising of your service dog.

 

NFR does not allow animals providing emotional support, comfort or therapy.

Can I smoke?

Smoking is only permitted in a designated outdoor smoking area. 

Smokers must bring all their own tobacco supplies. To minimize odors we ask you to wash your hands after smoking and not to wear smoke-filled clothing in the meditation hall. Smoking is not permitted indoors or elsewhere on the grounds or in the woods.

Can I light candles of incense?

Due to fire regulations, we do not allow you to light candles or burn incense, or light fires of any kind on NFR property. Exceptions to this rule are:

  • Smokers’ use of the smoking area at each center – please see above.

  • During certain retreats, teachers have permission to light ceremonial candles and incense in the meditation hall.

Are there ethical guidelines for retreat life?

The Five or Eight Precepts

A core aspect of the Buddha’s teaching is the importance of living by certain ethical guidelines. At NFR, these guidelines – known as the Five Precepts – form an integral part of daily life, and are adopted by everyone here, from retreatants and visitors to teachers and staff.

A commitment to undertake training in these precepts helps ensure our retreat environment of safety, refuge and non-harming.

We encourage living by these ethical guidelines whether or not you are on retreat.

  • To refrain from harming any living, sentient beings – not to kill or intentionally hurt any person or creature, even an insect.

  • To refrain from taking what is not freely given – not to steal or ‘borrow’ without the consent of the giver; to accept what is offered and not try to change it or get more.

  • To abstain from sexual activity.

  • To practice noble silence and to refrain from harming by one’s speech – not to lie, gossip or use harsh or hurtful language.

  • To abstain from using alcohol, recreational drugs and other intoxicants that cloud the mind and harm the body. (This does not apply to prescription medicines.)

  • During most NFR retreats offered by monastic teachers, retreatants are asked to abide by Eight Precepts.

 

The additional three precepts participants undertake while on retreat are:

  • To refrain from eating after 12pm.

  • To refrain from dancing, singing, music, shows; from the use of garlands, perfumes, cosmetics and adornments.

  • To refrain from using high and luxurious seats and beds.

Does Nibbāna Forest Refuge have a Teacher Code of Ethics?

As NFR teachers, we recognize that the foundation of spiritual life rests upon our mindful and caring relationship to all the lives and life around us. For those of us who live a lay life, we acknowledge that until we have the permanent support of monastic vows and customs from our local Theravada Buddhist Sangha, we, lay teachers, need clear guidelines that help ensure the wisest ethical conduct possible.

In keeping with this understanding, and for the long-term benefit of ourselves and the community at large, we agree to uphold, at a minimum, the five lay training precepts. These are expanded below to make them explicitly appropriate in our role as teachers of the Dhamma in our specific cultural setting.

We agree to the following guidelines:

1. We undertake the precept of refraining from killing.

We agree to acknowledge the interconnection of all beings and our respect for all life. We agree to refine our understanding of not killing and non-harming in all our actions. We seek to understand the implication of this precept in such difficult areas as abortion, euthanasia, and the killing of pets. While some of us recommend vegetarianism, and others do not, we all commit ourselves to fulfilling this precept in the spirit of reverence for life.

2. We undertake the precept of refraining from stealing.

We agree to not take that which does not belong to us and to respect the property of others. We agree to bring consciousness to the use of all of the earth’s resources in a respectful and ecological way. We agree to be honest in our dealing with money and not to misappropriate money committed to Dhamma projects. We agree to offer teachings without favoritism in regard to any student’s financial circumstances.

3. We undertake the precept of refraining from sexual misconduct.

We agree to avoid creating harm through sexuality and to avoid sexual exploitation or relationships of a sexual manner that are outside the bounds of the relationship commitments we have made to another, or that involve another who has made vows to someone else.

NFR teachers with vows of celibacy will live according to their vows. NFR teachers in committed relationships will honor their vows and refrain from adultery. All teachers agree not to use their teaching role to exploit their authority and position in order to assume a sexual relationship with a student.

Because several single teachers in our community have developed partnerships and marriages with former students, we acknowledge that such a healthy relationship can be possible, but that great care and sensitivity are needed. We agree that in this case the following guidelines are crucial:

  • A sexual relationship is never appropriate between teachers and current students.

  • During retreats or formal teaching, any intimation of future student-teacher romantic or sexual relationship is inappropriate.

  • If interest in a genuine and committed relationship develops over time between a single teacher and a student, the student-teacher relationship must clearly and consciously have ended, and the student and teacher must then consult with a senior teacher before any further development toward a romantic relationship. Such a relationship must be approached with restraint and sensitivity – in no case should it occur immediately after retreat. A minimum time period of three months or longer from the last formal teaching between them, and a clear understanding from both parties that the student-teacher relationship has ended must be coupled with a conscious commitment to enter into a relationship that brings no harm to either party.

4. We undertake the precept of refraining from false speech.

We agree to speak that which is true and useful and to refrain from gossip in our community. We agree to hold in confidence what is explicitly told to us in confidence. We agree to cultivate conscious and clear communication, and to cultivate the quality of lovingkindness and honesty as the basis of our speech.

Specifically, we will not publish any confidential conversations with students, whether those students are named or remain anonymous, without their prior written consent. This includes Dhamma articles, books, interviews and blogs, both in print and online. Conversations with yogis may be recounted in Dhamma talks, whether posted online or not, as long as prior verbal permission is given. It is generally suggested that the teacher mask the yogi’s name and other identifying details.

5. We undertake the precept of refraining from intoxicants that cause heedlessness or loss of awareness.

It is clear that substance abuse is the cause of tremendous suffering. We agree that there should be no use of intoxicants during retreats or while on retreat premises. We agree not to abuse or misuse intoxicants at any time.

About Volunteering

How do I sign up to volunteer at a daylong or residential retreat I’d like to attend?

If you find a program you’d like to attend and volunteer for, contact the us to inquire about available spaces. We schedule volunteers starting from four to six weeks prior to the date of the program, but sometimes have last-minute need for helpers so don’t hesitate to reach out.  If we have a space for you, we will register you for the program and there is no need to sign up online. 

How much time is required for a day retreat, what will I be doing, and will I miss any of the program?

Typical day-of event volunteer hours are 8am to 5pm, with the volunteer shifts being primarily the hour before and hour following the program, depending on the timing and size.  Day-of event volunteers arrive an hour to 90 minutes early to help set up cushions and chairs in the program room, greet folks as they arrive, check off people who have already registered or assist folks who register at the door. Volunteers offer the event coordinator 15-20 minutes of help during the lunch break. At the end of the program, volunteers help put away chairs, sweep the hall, empty the garbage and recycling, collect and label lost and found items, and tidy up the hall.  Volunteers may miss up to 15 – 30 minutes of the program and should be open to doing any of the tasks assigned by the retreat manager which usually include lifting up to 20lbs and some physical chores.  If you are unable to do so, please let us know in advance so we can match you with an appropriate task. 

How much time is required for a day retreat, what will I be doing, and will I miss any of the program?

Typical day-of event volunteer hours are 8am to 5pm, with the volunteer shifts being primarily the hour before and hour following the program, depending on the timing and size.  Day-of event volunteers arrive an hour to 90 minutes early to help set up cushions and chairs in the program room, greet folks as they arrive, check off people who have already registered or assist folks who register at the door. Volunteers offer the event coordinator 15-20 minutes of help during the lunch break. At the end of the program, volunteers help put away chairs, sweep the hall, empty the garbage and recycling, collect and label lost and found items, and tidy up the hall.  Volunteers may miss up to 15 – 30 minutes of the program and should be open to doing any of the tasks assigned by the retreat manager which usually include lifting up to 20lbs and some physical chores.  If you are unable to do so, please let us know in advance so we can match you with an appropriate task. 

Can I bring my dog to Nibbāna Forest Refuge?

Only service dogs specifically trained to support physical limitations are permitted at our retreat center.  For the safety of your pet and the animals that live on this land, and out of respect for the experience of other attendees, Nibbāna Forest Refuge strongly requests that you leave pets at home. It is not safe to allow pets to run free on the land, be tied up outdoors, or be left in a car.